October 01, 2014   7 Tishrei 5775
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 Jan Durecki, Archivist
franklinarchives@tbeonline.org

Hours:

Monday - Thursday: 10 am - 5 pm
Contact Information:
248-851-1100, ext. 3137
franklinarchives@tbeonline.org

The Friends of the Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives  


The Friends of the Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives is a group of committed contributors and supporters dedicated to maintaining and preserving the rich, historic collections of manuscripts, photographs, audiovisual materials, architectural drawings and rare books found within the Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives.

As a Friend of the Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives, your contribution will help promote a greater understanding and appreciation of the Archives, support its operation and growth and increase access to the Archives through unique and interesting programming.

Membership Levels:
  $36 Friend       $72 Family      $150 Corporation/Foundation       $250 Future Generation      $______  Other

Please make checks payable to and mail to:  The Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives, 7400 Telegraph Road, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48301

In Memory  

 

Rabbi Hertz  


Rabbi Hertz Eulogies

From 1953 to 1988, Rabbi Richard Hertz officiated at more than 1600 funeral services. It was the rabbi’s custom to write an outline of his remarks on an envelope that he slipped into his jacket pocket On the envelope, Rabbi Hertz wrote the name of the deceased and his/her family, their date of death, place of interment, and his personal insights into their life and character. Often the inside of the envelope contained additional information such as a cemetery record and a newspaper obituary. On a few occasions, the rabbi also saved typed copies and audio cassettes of his eulogies. These “eulogy envelopes,” outlines and cassettes are important historical and genealogical resources that can be located in the searchable pdf file that can be found by clicking on the link below. Once you have identified the name of the deceased, please visit, email or call the archive for further information. The archives can be reached at 248-865-0628 or
franklinarchives@tbeonline.org. This list was prepared by archives’ intern Robbie Terman and volunteer Suzie MacWilliams.

Searchable Rabbi Hertz Eulogy Files

The Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives  

Temple Beth El, Michigan's first Jewish Congregation, was founded in 1850 when twelve German immigrant families drew together in the home of Isaac and Sarah Cozens to form the Beth El Society.

Temple Beth El is home to one of the most comprehensive congregational archives in the nation and the largest such collection in Michigan. The archives is named in memory of Dr. Leo M. Franklin, Temple Beth El's beloved rabbi from 1899-1941 and one of the leading voices of the Reform Movement nationwide. The Archives was founded in 1981 using materials collected by Leo M. Franklin and Irving Katz, noted Jewish Historian and Temple Executive Secretary from 1939 until his death in 1979. It was maintained by congregants Miriam and Aid Kushner until 1997 when the first full-time professional Archivist was hired. The Archives continues to be strengthened by donations of materials and monetary contributions from individuals and foundations.

Jewish War Veterans Michigan Website  
Services From The Archives  



A Service of the
Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives

Have you ever wondered what to do with your boxes and bags of family documents, photographs and home movies, and other memorabilia? What should be saved and what can be disposed of? Have you ever given away a possession only to later learn of its historic value? The Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives is pleased to announce a new service to help you answer these important questions. Our new Archivist on Call Service will bring Temple Beth El’s trained professional archivist to your home to organize, preserve and catalogue your prized possessions. The archivist will work side-by-side with you to identify the items that have current and future historic value.

You may select from many options that begin with the basic cataloging of your family’s documents and photographs to the creation of DVDs that include scanned and captioned images, videotaped oral histories and digitized home movies. Each project is as unique as the family’s history that it captures. Our Archivist On Call Service provides you with a means to assemble your family’s history in an orderly and concise package that will let generations yet-to-be-born who you were and how you lived your life. By doing so, you give them firsthand information that will strengthen their connections to the family and to the past – the most valuable legacy that you could have ever bequeathed them.

As part of the Archivist On Call Service, the archivist will:

3 Discuss the scope of your project during a free,
     one hour in-home consultation

3 Mail a check list of documents, photographs and 
    artifacts for you to collect and have available
    during the consultation

3 Submit a detailed project report of the services to
     be rendered, and an estimate of time and costs

3 If desired, arrange for video taped oral history sessions

3 If desired, co-ordinate the production of
     DVD containing scanned images of your family’s
     documents and photographs

To arrange your free, one hour in-home consultation contact:
Jan Durecki, Director, Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives, Temple Beth El
248-865-0628 or franklinarchives@tbeonline.org

The War Collection  


VETERANS

THE FRANKLIN

ARCHIVES

WANTS YOUR:

PHOTOGRAPHS, LETTERS, DIARIES UNIFORMS, MEDALS, OR ANY OTHER MILITARY MEMORABILIA
To preserve your cherished memories contact:
Jan Durecki, Archivist
Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives
Temple Beth El, 248-851-1100, ext. 3137

Where were you during World War II?
By Jan Durecki, Archivist

I am collecting stories and photographs relating to the manner in which Jewish Detroiters coped with the effects of the Second World War. These reminiscences will be incorporated into World War II, the USO and Jewish Detroit’s Response to the War Effort, the second presentation of the Jewish History Detectives’ Lecture Series September 10. These stories of home-front sacrifices and activities are being gathered from Temple members as well as from the local Jewish community.

I am interested in highlighting the everyday experiences that individually, and in their totality, contributed to the Allies’ victory. Were you a young wife and mother during the war? If so, how did your family deal with rationing? Did you belong to a Boy Scout or Girl Scout troop during the war years? Did you and your fellow scouts visit VA hospitals or correspond with GIs? Were you a Civil Defense warden or a Rosie the Riveter defense worker? Did you frequent the USO or other recreation centers that catered to visiting service personnel? These are but a few examples of the many efforts that drew the Jewish community together during the War and merit sharing with the TBE community.

The Rabbi Leo M. Franklin Archives is committed to collecting Jewish Detroit’s social history. Your personal stories of war-related activities will further our collective knowledge of the Jewish patriotism and solidarity with the War effort. Contact Archivist Jan Durecki at 248-851-1100, ext. 3137.


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